Why Do Dogs Bite Blankets?

Why do dogs bite blankets? Some dogs just enjoy gnawing on blankets. For example, little pugs or Boston terriers may enjoy munching on their blankets at night. However, if your dog loves to gnaw on blankets but doesn’t seem to be getting away from his habit, it may be a sign that he needs more medical attention. You can try consulting a vet to find the underlying issue.

Some dogs just enjoy chewing on blankets, while others don’t even notice! Regardless of the cause, you can try to limit your dog’s access to blankets by using something else as a chew toy.

Many dogs will try to escape the anxiety or fear by chewing blankets, others to escape boredom, and a few may chew the blankets just to show their excitement.

When your dog is chewing a blanket for any of these reasons, you can give them a quick correction or remove the blanket from the scene. Most dogs will stop chewing on the blanket and change their behavior, but if your dog does not seem to care about the correction, you can try a different approach.

Biting a dog when they are feeling playful or nervous can be actuated through anxiety and stress, as well as boredom, which is the main reason why your dog chews. Providing your dog with toys that they can chew on will also help them release their anxiety and keep them engaged when you are not home.

Similarly, provide your dog with fun activities that they can enjoy like running, playing fetch, or just cuddling. Keeping them busy will prevent them from feeling bored and stressed, which in turn will help reduce their chances of biting. Ensure that your dog does not go without adequate exercise. A dog who is over-active or inactive will likely have a high biting rate.

Keep on reading to know more:

Why do dogs bite blankets?

Biting a blanket when they are feeling playful or nervous can be actuated through anxiety and stress, as well as boredom, which is the main reason why your dog chews.

Providing your dog with toys that they can chew on will also help them release their anxiety and keep them engaged when you are not home. Similarly, provide your dog with fun activities that they can enjoy like running, playing fetch, or just cuddling.

Keeping them busy will prevent them from feeling bored and stressed, which in turn will help reduce their chances of biting the blanket. Ensure that your dog does not go without adequate exercise. A dog who is over-active or inactive will likely have a high biting rate.

A teething dog is also more likely to chew on blankets if he’s anxious or in pain. Even though your dog might enjoy the act of chewing, it’s best to distract him from the comfort blanket by providing a chew toy or putting a damp cloth over his gums. Your dog might also enjoy the chew toy more than the blanket, making it a good opportunity to play.

The reason behind your dog chewing blankets is crucial to know so, you can work on it. You can visit the vet in this regard, so he can guide you.

What should I do to stop my dog from chewing my blankets?

The most obvious way, our first step to stop the behavior is to identify the source of the problem. After that you can work on solutions like providing them with toys, providing them mental and physical stimulation, or visiting the vet instead.

Reasons on why do dogs bite blankets:

Some possible reasons that come from various sources are the following:

They are feeling excited:

When your dog is too excited to sleep, he may chew on furniture or carpet to release tension. This can also indicate a need to socialize. You can help your dog to relax by talking to him softly or giving him toys to play with. 

They are feeling fear:

Your pet may also chew on blankets when he’s feeling stressed out or anxious. If your dog is always on the go, he may find a blanket soothing to cuddle up with. It is important to get your dog’s full story and to seek medical help if needed. Anxiety can develop for a number of reasons, and can often be reduced with behavior modification and stress reduction techniques.

They are having boredom:

This is a natural behavior for many dogs, and it’s not a sign of any sort of dental disease but of inadequate stimulation. It is a sign that the dog is just not interested in what is happening around him.

They are feeling anxiety:

The blanket may feel soothing to your dog, or it could be a way to escape from an anxious situation. If your dog frequently chews blankets, you may want to consider purchasing an alternative material. Another option is to purchase a chew toy that is specifically made to relieve anxiety in dogs.

And if your dog has anxiety, it’s important to identify the cause and work to correct it. Common causes of anxiety in dogs include: a new environment or owner, rushed places, too much noise, etc.

They are in pain:

If your dog is constantly chewing on blankets, it may be a sign that he’s experiencing some type of discomfort. For example, your dog may be chews on the blanket to soothe his discomfort during a cold season. If he’s in pain It is best to try to figure out the cause of the pain. An important part of that process is carrying out a thorough checkup.

They are have teething:

While most of your dog’s teeth are still growing, his incisors are the first ones to emerge. As soon as they’re visible, he starts gnawing on blankets or other soft objects to ease his gums. You can provide them with a chewing toy instead.

What should you do if your dog is teething?

If your dog is teething, the vet can recommend a specific chew toy to treat the problem, or you can find quality chewing toys in the market or online. Some dogs find it relaxing to chew on a particular toy for an extended period of time, which could help ease their discomfort.

How to stop your dog from biting Blanket?

What if your dog keeps chewing the blanket and you don’t like it? Here we have some solutions to your problem mentioned below:

Train your dog actively:

Provide them with some meaningful activities to do such as playing with a favorite tennis ball, running around the block, or retrieving a tennis ball from the kitchen.

Give them toys for biting:

Allow them to participate in different games and activities. This can be as simple as going for a walk or giving your dog a chance to run around a little bit. If your dog is couch-bound, you may want to consider providing them with a chew toy.

Try to train your dog to stop biting:

Even if your dog doesn’t know how to stop doing it on his own, you can give him a behavior task to focus on. For example, you could have him sit when he’s chewing on a blanket and then give him a treat when he sits. You can also use a dog toy or other object to keep your dog occupied while you’re away.

It’s also a good idea to purchase a variety of dog toys so that your dog has something to chew on while you’re gone.

In serious cases of chewing on blankets while teething, your vet may recommend a small incision to release the tooth. 

Figuring out the underlying cause is very important. You may like to visit the vet in this regard.

Contact your Vet’s help:

If your dog is chewing for no apparent reason, then you should schedule a medical exam. If you think he is suffering from any kind of injury, then that could be the cause. If he is doing it to get attention or to get something to eat, then you should make sure that he gets adequate amounts of both. Just try to figure out the problem first.

How To Train Your Dog For Good Behavior:

Train your dog to not chew on blankets by setting a good example by not letting the blanket be the focus of the dog’s chewing. There are many options when it comes to how to train your dog to stop chewing blankets. You can try using a variety of different options. We’ll share some with you below:

  1. You can start teaching your dog early on by setting a positive example.  Train your dog as early as possible to help them learn from a young age. As your dog gets older, you can start reinforcing good behavior with a treat.
  2. This is an opportunity to work on your training methods and your dog’s behavior. Some dogs chew because they can’t control themselves, while others do so to relax. Consistent training can help eliminate this behavior and make your dog happy and healthy.
  3. Positive reinforcement is great because it is a quick and easy way to get your dog to do what you want them to do. It can also be used as a way to decrease the anxiety in your dog.
  4. Keep in mind that training your puppy or dog can be easier said than done. Many owners think that because their dog is “small” it’s easier to train them. However, dogs of all sizes can be trained, and the trick is to be patient. A dog’s size doesn’t determine his or her ability to be trained. Be patient with your dog, and you’ll be rewarded with good behavior in return.
  5. You may want to seek professional advice if you are having trouble training your dog on your own or if you have a dog that is always up for a fight. You may also want to consider getting help if your dog has bad habits that you can’t seem to break such as chewing. Dog training is a very personalized process, and it’s important to work with a professional who is familiar with your dog’s breed and personal history.

Should I seek a vet’s help if my dogs is chewing on blanket?

A professional can help you work through any issues that are preventing you from training your dog. They can also make sure you’re using the right technique when training your pup.

In addition to improving your own skills as a dog trainer, a professional can also give you feedback on how to improve your skills.

Conclusions:

Now you get your answer on why do dogs bite blankets? It’s important to recognize that chewing on a blanket doesn’t usually indicate a problem. If your dog enjoys playing with blankets, you can try a toy next time.

Try to figure out the cause whether it’s any kind of fear, anxiety, discomfort, excitement, or something else. Regardless of the reasons you would like to get rid of this habit of them. We have shared some valuable solutions to this problem above, check them out!

Emma is a dog owner named Petdoggie. She loves to have a pet and has so much knowledge about them and that's why she started Mypetdoggie.com to share her knowledge with other dog owners.